In the early twentieth century, you could buy a house kit from the Sears catalog. The kit included plans, instructions, lumber, and other necessary building supplies. The Holleman House is an example of the “Americus” plan from Sears. It is a…

The Anderson House is a Sears catalog home, built from the “Argyle” plan for a Craftsman-style gable-front bungalow. Sears, Roebuck & Company sold plans and even full build-it-yourself kits in the early twentieth century. A kit would include…

The Dr. M.T. Pope House is the last structure in its original location illustrating the presence of a middle and professional class of African-American families along South Wilmington Street. Dr. Pope was a politically active and well-known African…

The Turner House is an intact Neoclassical I-house in the African American community of Oberlin. The house was expanded by John T. Turner, Oberlin's major landowner, around 1900 from a three-room one-story house. While the I-house type is more often…

Built by local businessman Joel K. Marshall, this house is among the most intact examples of the elaborately ornamental Queen Anne dwellings that reflect the Victorian era in Raleigh. The interior features excellent examples of early Colonial Revival…

At the start of the twentieth-century, the once-rural freedman's village of Oberlin had grown into a tight-knit community of middle-class African American families. Oberlin had well-established churches, small retail shops, and the highest rate of…

Dr. Andrew Watson Goodwin ran medical clinics, taught at Shaw University's Leonard Medical School, and served as chief physician at Saint Agnes Hospital. His grand, Neoclassical dwelling is significant as a vestige of what Hillsborough Street once…

Judge Walter A. Montgomery, a state supreme court justice, built this two-story frame house with classical detailing in the 100 block of E. Edenton Street. After its 1982 move to this New Bern Place location, renovations readied the house for use as…

The Thompson house is one of several remaining dwellings from the once-grand residential corridor that extended along Hillsborough Street from the Capitol west to Oberlin Road. The house, a combination of Queen Anne detailing and Colonial Revival…

The Garland Scott and Toler Moore Tucker House is an excellent, intact example of the Southern Colonial Revival style. With classical detailing and full-height porticos, the style conjures the idea of grand antebellum houses. Garland Tucker and his…

Designed by architect Harry P. S. Keller, the Dr. Z. M. Caveness House is a well-preserved brick foursquare distinguished by the low forms, strong horizontal lines, earthy materials, and overall sense of simplicity of the Prairie style of…

Located on the southeast corner of Pace and Blount streets, this house embodies the distinctive early twentieth-century Prairie style of architecture developed by Frank Lloyd Wright and characterized by horizontal lines, minimal detailing,…

Designed in the Beaux Arts style, this structure is the first urban high-rise apartment building erected in Raleigh. It consists of five floors arranged in a U-shape around a well in the main facade. All floor plans have the same features,…

Built by physician and business leader Lemuel Thackara Delany of the distinguished Delany family of Raleigh and his wife, Saint Augustine's College instructor Julia Amaza (Brown) Delany, this historically significant one-story frame dwelling is also…

The Andrews-London House is a fine example of the Georgian Revival style. Designed by James A. Salter, this two-and-one-half story brick house features extensive wainscot paneling as well as round-arched and pedimented molding at interior doorways.…

Wakestone was the home of Josephus Daniels, editor of the Raleigh News & Observer (1894-1933); Secretary of the Navy (1913-21) under President Woodrow Wilson; and Ambassador to Mexico (1933-41) under President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The house was…

This two-story brick house was built in the Georgian Revival style in the side yard of the Hawkins-Hartness House for Mrs. Hawkins's niece, Martha Hawkins Bailey. It is state headquarters for the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Date: 1922

David Weaver made Raleigh swing in the 1930s and 1940s. Weaver managed the dance hall in the Masonic Temple at 427 S. Blount Street; he ran a soda shop, billiard hall, beer garden, and a social club there, too. Weaver was also the local booking agent…

The Lawrence House is a rare and early example of a hollow-core concrete-block Craftsman bungalow. Bungalows, a popular house type in Raleigh and across the country in the 1920s, generally are of frame or brick construction and very commonly are…

This two-story, cross-gabled, frame California-style Craftsman bungalow features an aeroplane dormer, Japanese and Swiss-chalet elements, heavy open beams, battered brickwork motifs, and natural materials, color, and textures. The Foglemans purchased…