James Yadkin Joyner lived here throughout his influential tenure as the state’s Superintendent of Public Instruction, which lasted from 1902 to 1919. J.Y. Joyner oversaw a maturation of the state’s educational system, focusing on teacher…

The Atwater-Perry House is an excellent example of a late-nineteenth century, middle-class dwelling. The house is significant for its association with two middle-class black families in Raleigh. William Atwater, a grocer, bought the ca. 1898…

In the early twentieth century, you could buy a house kit from the Sears catalog. The kit included plans, instructions, lumber, and other necessary building supplies. The Holleman House is an example of the “Americus” plan from Sears. It is a…

The Anderson House is a Sears catalog home, built from the “Argyle” plan for a Craftsman-style gable-front bungalow. Sears, Roebuck & Company sold plans and even full build-it-yourself kits in the early twentieth century. A kit would include…

The ca. 1875 Merrimon-Wynne House is a lovely example of both the Italianate architectural style and the Eastlake mode of decoration. Elongated windows, upright proportions, and modillions under the broad eave are all hallmarks of the style, popular…

The Heck-Wynne House is one of three distinct landmarks built in a variation of the Second Empire style by Colonel Jonathan M. Heck, a developer in the Oakwood neighborhood. Located on adjacent lots in the Oakwood Historic District, the Heck-Lee,…

The Heck-Pool House is one of three distinct landmarks built in a variation of the Second Empire style by Colonel Jonathan M. Heck, a developer in the Oakwood neighborhood. Located on adjacent lots in the Oakwood Historic District, the Heck-Lee,…

The Heck-Lee House is one of three distinct landmarks built in a variation of the Second Empire style by Colonel Jonathan M. Heck, a developer in the Oakwood neighborhood. Located on adjacent lots in the Oakwood Historic District, the Heck-Lee,…

The Fadum House, designed in 1949 and completed in 1950, is the first modern design privately executed in Raleigh. This was the first house in Wake County to use structural wood columns to support a double-cantilevered roof truss grid, which shelters…

N.C. State's School of Design Dean Henry Kamphoefner, working with architect and professor George Matsumoto, designed this house for his own family. An ardent admirer of Frank Lloyd Wright, Kamphoefner incorporated typical Wrightian features. The…

George Matsumoto, a professor of architecture at NC State's School of Design, incorporated several of Frank Lloyd Wright's Usonian house ideas in his design for the Ritcher House: passive climate control, aesthetic use of common building materials,…

Raleigh architect G. Milton Small designed this house as his own residence. It is a nearly square one-story frame house sited on a steep hillside in a bend on Lake Boone Trail. Small studied under the Modernist master Mies van der Rohe at the…

George Matsumoto built this dwelling for himself, pioneering the use of modular building materials in an attempt to control costs. The proportions, detailing, and materials are exceptional, and the house makes a less-than-ideal building site a…

The Paul and Ellen Welles House was designed by Durham architect Kenneth McKoy, who graduated in 1950 as a member of the first graduating class of the School of Design, established at North Carolina State University under dean Henry Kamphoefner. The…

G. Milton Small found more inspiration from Ludwig Mies van der Rohe than from Frank Lloyd Wight. Working with a chic, opinionated client who wanted a "clean, crisp house," Small delivered an International Style gem loaded with function and elegance.…

Harwell Hamilton Harris, an internationally known Modernist architect, designed this flat-roofed, stucco-clad house to include living quarters for himself and his wife, a studio for his architectural practice, and a rental apartment. Harris is known…

Built in the early 1960s, this dramatic Modernist home is defined by its low, sweeping front gable deck roof that covers a recessed porch. Its post and beam structure conforms to the sloping site, with a one-story front elevation and a two-story rear…

Designed by local architect G Milton Small, a student of Mies van der Rohe, the Stahl House is an excellent example of a Contemporary Ranch style residence, as evidenced by its low-slung gable roof, post-and-beam construction, window walls, open…

The Dr. M.T. Pope House is the last structure in its original location illustrating the presence of a middle and professional class of African-American families along South Wilmington Street. Dr. Pope was a politically active and well-known African…

The Turner House is an intact Neoclassical I-house in the African American community of Oberlin. The house was expanded by John T. Turner, Oberlin's major landowner, around 1900 from a three-room one-story house. While the I-house type is more often…