The 1915 Curtis House, a two-story Late Victorian/Neoclassical dwelling, is a stylish family home built by William A. Curtis for his mother and siblings. After the death of his father, William, his mother, and his eldest siblings pursued work and…

The buildings and athletic facilities remaining at the Berry O’Kelly School campus reflect the history of an important Raleigh institution. Residents of the freedman’s village that evolved into Method had always prioritized education. Three schools…

This Craftsman bungalow is typical of dwellings built in the early twentieth century in Method, a neighborhood that evolved from an 1872 freedman’s village. The area was rural and miles beyond Raleigh’s nineteenth-century limits. By the 1920s, Method…

The H.J. Brown Coffin House Building was the early twentieth-century headquarters for a local business established in 1836. Originally a cabinet shop and later a maker of coffins, it evolved into an undertaking and mortuary company that eventually…

Gethsemane Seventh-Day Adventist Church at 501 South Person Street was the first SDA church, black or white, established in Raleigh. Many of Gethsemane’s elders and pastors went on to become influential leaders in the black SDA movement, most notably…

Leonard Medical Hospital was erected in 1912 to support the neighboring Leonard Medical School in the education of black physicians at Shaw University. The hospital initially opened in an 1885 frame building behind the medical school. It provided…

St. Matthews is one of just five remaining Rosenwald schools in Wake County; twenty-one were built in the early twentieth century. Julius Rosenwald, an owner of Sears, Roebuck, and Company, established a charitable fund to open schools for African…

A church is built on the strength—and often gumption—of its congregation. In the early 1920s, after a year or so of tent meetings, a growing group of Seventh Day Adventists managed to erect a sanctuary, the first of its denomination in Raleigh.…

The Mecca is a Raleigh institution. Greek immigrant Nick Dombalis and his wife Helen opened The Mecca Luncheonette on Fayetteville Street in 1930. They bought this building in 1937 and moved the restaurant. Like the Sir Walter Raleigh Hotel, The…

In the early twentieth century, you could buy a house kit from the Sears catalog. The kit included plans, instructions, lumber, and other necessary building supplies. The Holleman House is an example of the “Americus” plan from Sears. It is a…

The Anderson House is a Sears catalog home, built from the “Argyle” plan for a Craftsman-style gable-front bungalow. Sears, Roebuck & Company sold plans and even full build-it-yourself kits in the early twentieth century. A kit would include plans,…

The Dr. M.T. Pope House is the last structure in its original location illustrating the presence of a middle and professional class of African-American families along South Wilmington Street. Dr. Pope was a politically active and well-known African…

The Turner House is an intact Neoclassical I-house in the African American community of Oberlin. The house was expanded by John T. Turner, Oberlin's major landowner, around 1900 from a three-room one-story house. While the I-house type is more often…

Built by local businessman Joel K. Marshall, this house is among the most intact examples of the elaborately ornamental Queen Anne dwellings that reflect the Victorian era in Raleigh. The interior features excellent examples of early Colonial Revival…

At the start of the twentieth-century, the once-rural freedman's village of Oberlin had grown into a tight-knit community of middle-class African American families. Oberlin had well-established churches, small retail shops, and the highest rate of…

Dr. Andrew Watson Goodwin ran medical clinics, taught at Shaw University's Leonard Medical School, and served as chief physician at Saint Agnes Hospital. His grand, Neoclassical dwelling is significant as a vestige of what Hillsborough Street once…

Judge Walter A. Montgomery, a state supreme court justice, built this two-story frame house with classical detailing in the 100 block of E. Edenton Street. After its 1982 move to this New Bern Place location, renovations readied the house for use as…

The Thompson house is one of several remaining dwellings from the once-grand residential corridor that extended along Hillsborough Street from the Capitol west to Oberlin Road. The house, a combination of Queen Anne detailing and Colonial Revival…

The Garland Scott and Toler Moore Tucker House is an excellent, intact example of the Southern Colonial Revival style. With classical detailing and full-height porticos, the style conjures the idea of grand antebellum houses. Garland Tucker and his…

Designed by architect Harry P. S. Keller, the Dr. Z. M. Caveness House is a well-preserved brick foursquare distinguished by the low forms, strong horizontal lines, earthy materials, and overall sense of simplicity of the Prairie style of…