Joel Lane built the original dwelling, a frame house in the hall and parlor plan, for his son Henry. The house is named for Moses Mordecai, who married into the Lane family and provided in his will for the 1826 Greek Revival addition, designed by…

The gambrel-roofed home of Colonel Joel Lane has been restored to its 1790-1795 appearance by the Wake County Committee of the Colonial Dames. Colonel Lane became known as the "Father of Raleigh" after he sold a thousand acres of land to the state in…

Joseph Lane, brother of Joel Lane, who owned the land upon which Raleigh was founded, built this small Georgian style farmhouse in western Wake County. The house, moved to its present location in 1980 to prevent demolition, has been rehabilitated.…

This Federal-style plantation house features molded weatherboards, modillion cornice, Flemish bond chimneys and six-panel doors. Nathaniel Jones, an early Wake County settler, built the dwelling. Today, the wooded site is an eighteenth-century island…

Built for John Haywood, state treasurer for forty years, Haywood Hall remained home to one of North Carolina's most distinguished families until 1977. The family bequeathed the late Georgian/early Federal-style house to the State Society of the…

Also known as Whitehall, the original late Georgian/early Federal-style dwelling was built for secretary of state William White. The house has undergone major changes including the addition of a Victorian wing and an about face when the City of…

The Trinity House is Wake County's oldest surviving brick house. Despite an expansion in the nineteenth century and extensive remodeling in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, the house retains original details like the Flemish-bond brick…

Andrew Johnson, seventeenth president of the United States, was born in this tiny gambrel-roofed building with a loft. The building was the detached kitchen for Peter Casso's Inn as well as home to the four members of the Johnson family. Originally…

Elmwood, a two-and-one-half story frame townhouse, has been home to many distinguished North Carolinians including two Supreme Court chief justices, an associate justice, an ambassador and a historian. The house displays many Federal-period…

Spring Hill was the home of prominent late-eighteenth/early-nineteenth-century plantation owner and lawyer, Theophilus Hunter Jr. The earliest marked grave in Wake County, that of pioneer settler Theophilus Hunter Sr., is in the yard. The dwelling…

Named for Phares Yates, whose family operated it from 1869 to 1948, Yates Mill is the only water-powered mill building remaining in Wake County. Remodeled at various times, its present size and configuration date to the 1850s. Prior to closing in…

Raleigh's oldest surviving financial building housed the first state-sponsored banking institution in North Carolina. Architecturally, the building represents the transition between Federal and Greek Revival styles and features handmade brick as well…